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The 41st Anniversary
2017 ‘O‘o Awards Gala

                      When: Friday, April 28, 2017, from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

       Where: Hilton Hawaiian Village, Coral Ballroom

 

About the ‘O‘o Award

The ‘Ō‘ō Award has become one of the most prestigious honors presented to outstanding Native Hawaiians who, through their talents, have made significant contributions to improve our communities and the well being of Native Hawaiians. The ‘ō‘ō itself is made from precious hardwoods firmly rooted in the ‘āina. Today, the tool is used as NHCC’s symbol representing each honoree’s keen sense of firmly rooted values, business acumen, skill, and dedication to service – key ingredients for sustaining success in modern Hawai‘i, while maintaining ancient traditions and values.

This year's theme is “Ku Hina”, a name found in dream and prayer. It is not about any single phase of the moon. It is about all the phases. It is representation of the changes in all phenomenon. Like the process from new moon to full moon, it captures the changes we are all experiencing and the continual evolution of our community, organizations and individual selves.

 

Become an Event Sponsor

The ‘Ō ‘ō Awards Gala is our premier fundraising event supporting scholarship opportunities for Native Hawaiian students along with NHCC’s many programs.   Help us honor these outstanding individuals with your sponsorship.


Sponsorship levels:

  • Hoʻokele: $5,000
  • Nā Kanaka: $3,500
  • Hoʻoulu: $2,000
  • Kuleana: $1,500

This Year's Honorees

 

This year's theme is “Ku Hina”, a name found in dream and prayer. It is not about any single phase of the moon. It is about all the phases. It is representation of the changes in all phenomenon. Like the process from new moon to full moon, it captures the changes we are all experiencing and the continual evolution of our community, organizations and individual selves.

We are proud to present this year's  'O'o Award to the following honorees:


Gerard Akaka

Vice President, Medical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer for The Queen’s Medical Center. Dr. Akaka joined The Queen’s Medical Center in 2002 as the Medical Director of The Queen’s Emma Clinics (QEC). Dr. Akaka is a Clinical Faculty member in the Department of Medicine at the John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) at the University of Hawaii. In 2006, in addition to his Queen Emma Clinics duties, Dr. Akaka was appointed as the Medical Director of the Native Hawaiian Health Program of The Queen’s Health Systems. Prior to coming to Queen’s, he served as the Medical Director of the Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center. Dr. Akaka was named Queen’s “Outstanding Physician of the Year” in 2004.

Although he didn't at first choose medicine, Akaka found passion and focus when he was accepted at the University of Hawaii's John A. Burns School of Medicine. Under Akaka, QEC has increased the number of patients served while costs have decreased. The vision is clear at QEC: a significant impact on Native Hawaiian health, world class health care for all and doctors who learn to practice the art of medicine with aloha.


Herb Lee

Herb Lee has been the Executive Director of the Pacific American Foundation since 2005. In 2011 he was selected to the National Environmental Justice Advisory Committee Indigenous People Working Group and received the Historic Hawaii Foundation’s highest Preservation Award for his work at Waikalua Loko Fishpond.

In 2014, he received three awards including: (1) one of ten in the country designated by President Obama as a “Cesar Chavez Champion of Change;” (2) the Hawaii Maoli and the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs as one of three to receive its “Ka Mana o ke Kanaka, the Spirit of the Hawaiian” award, and (3) the Rotary Club of Honolulu’s, Jerry C. L. Chang “Peacemaker Award.”

His programs have trained over 4,500 teachers statewide in over 150 schools and benefited more than 100,000 students. The Pacific American Foundation has been recognized as one of the leading non- profits in the development and training of rigorous culture-based education programs for both Native Hawaiians and non-Hawaiian students.


Naomi Losch

Naomi Losch followed her love of Hawaiian culture and pursued her education in the Hawaiian language at a time when not many people were speaking the Hawaiian language. She became one of Hawaii’s foremost authorities and educators in Hawaiian Language, and started the Hawaiian Language programs at Windward Community College and Leeward Community College. Naomi is a former chair of the Hawaiian and Indo-Pacific Languages and Literatures Department at UH-Manoa.

Naomi Losch retired as an Associate Professor of Hawaiian at UH-Manoa in 2010. She is credited for her work on the educational forefront contributing to the growing relevance of Native Hawaiian issues — in politics, education, the arts and the environment. Hawaiian culture is now considered a contributing sector for success in business as well. In essence, a new kind of business model emerged, whose very purpose is to preserve, promote and explain Hawaiian culture.

 

Past Winners

 

Nominate a Hawaiian Business Leader

Each Year the Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce recognizes outstanding Native Hawaiians who, through their talents, have made significant contributions to improve our communities and the well being of Native Hawaiians.

Nominations are NOW OPEN for the 2018 'Ō'ō Award!  We have so many deserving leaders.  Nominate one today!

Submission Deadline:  Thursday, September 29, 2017 by 4:00 pm

 

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